Monday, September 15, 2014

The Spotlight Campaign: Great Creativity by Jesse Bluma



The Spotlight Campaign:  Great Creativity 





ABOUT THE CAMPAIGN

Our ideas, our creations, our spirit, and our great actions have always been key.  I know what it’s like to create something, the hard work it takes to accomplish goals, and to stand with others.  I know with my readers we share an elevated approach to food, information, and inspiration.  Liberating food and taste is the mission.  It is a holistic approach to living well and freeing our taste in food and much more.  Pointe Viven reflects my spirit and its clients.  It is a dynamic community of liberating food and taste.

 Over the years it has been terrific to meet, spotlight, and feature creators, doers, and inspirational figures.  I know no matter where I am, where I visit, and with whom I meet I will learn something and be re-energized by their endeavors.  Each month join me in spotlighting the famous, the not so famous, the local celebrities, and those you believe have earned a thank you, a congratulations, and the recognition.



Each month a new theme will be chosen, so be thinking of those people you know exhibit the traits.  Often the trait is something not so measurable, rather it is shown through the mundane, certain instances, and moments that surprise you.  This is your opportunity to join me and take part in the campaign.

In August we celebrated good stewards of nature.  Those that exhibit joy for the great outdoors.  Individuals making great strides in liberating their lives and the lives of others through being outside in forests, deserts, mountains, on lakes, and at sea.

September:  This month we are spotlighting great creativity.  We are looking for those that exhibit a good sense of vision, those that inspire others, those that give us something meaningful and valuable to consider.  Those demonstrating creativity in business, technology, teaching, baking, cooking, music, theology, art, everyday living, as students, and more.  Famous artists, such as Joan Miró from Barcelona, Spain and others demonstrate mastery of skill and technique.  There are countless other well known and not so prominent examples. 



The power of creativity is immense.  The attitude, hard work, training, enjoyment, and divine that emerges from expression, innovation, originality, independence, and illumination builds a legacy for oneself, teaches others, and provides a cathartic outlet.  Creativity is positive, renews, instructs, and builds character.  Creativity does not demean, persecute, lie, manipulate, propagandize, nor is it blasphemy.  Creativity is rooted the Latin etymology of create--to make and grow.  Derogatory bias is manipulation, not to be confused with growth and creation through imagination.  

As the poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow in the 1800s A.D. wrote in “A Pslam of Life”,

“In the world’s broad field of battle.
In the bivouac of Life,
Be not like dumb, driven cattle!
Be a hero in the strife!...

Let us, then, be up and doing,
With a heart for any fate;
Still achieving, still pursuing, 
Learn to labor and wait.”

Examples abound of this kind of dedication, this fervor of the creative human spirit.  As we take a moment to spotlight creative individuals, we pause to consider their knowledge, purpose, great thinking, apprenticeship, work, and contributions.  Creative individuals cross all sections of our culture and embody many characteristics, such as imaginative, playful, resourceful, thoughtful, and dedicated.






Artisanal treats by Jesse Bluma at PointeViven
using organic ingredients and inspiration
from California, Central, and South America.

Order online or contact me for catering.

Join the Pointe Viven circle

sign-up for email updates.      



Wednesday, September 10, 2014

Triscuit with Pea and Feta Spread topped with Andouille by Jesse Bluma



Triscuit with Pea and Feta Spread topped with Andouille





Peas and Triscuit Recipe

Triscuits topped with a layer of toasted walnuts, pea and feta spread, diced andouille, and dill to garnish.  This satisfies your appetite for salty, sweet, and savory.

Ingredients for walnut layer

2 cups light brown sugar
4 cups chopped walnuts
10 Tablespoons butter
1 teaspoon vanilla extract

In a large pan on low heat toast the walnuts.
Place the sugar and butter in the pan, then stir until the butter is melted.
Add in the vanilla.


Ingredients for the pea layer

2 cups frozen peas, and an additional pea to garnish each cracker
8 ounces reduced fat feta cheese
zest of two organic lemons (washed)
6 Tablespoons lemon juice
6 Tablespoons dill
8 Tablespoons olive oil

Defrost the peas. 
Blend the ingredients for the spread in a food processor or mixer. 


1 box Triscuits (whole wheat wafer crackers)


For the andouille

2 organic andouille sausages, diced, and prepared in a skillet on medium heat.


Assemble

Spread a thin layer of walnuts on each Triscuit.
Add a teaspoon of the pea and feta mixture, then evenly spread.
Top with andouille.
Garnish with a snip of dill.






Artisanal treats by Jesse Bluma at PointeViven
using organic ingredients and inspiration
from California, Central, and South America.

Order online or contact me for catering.

Join the Pointe Viven circle

sign-up for email updates.      


Friday, August 15, 2014

Wild Hibiscus Negroni by Jesse Bluma








Get smart with this cocktail recipe for my twist on a Negroni.  This Italian born drink is refreshing, good to sip, and has a complex slightly sweet and bitter flavor.  The substitution of wild hibiscus rose syrup for aperol (an orange alcohol) gives a burst of flavor.  Hibiscus is a tropical plant and beyond landscapes is utilized in tea, Mexican cuisine when dried or candied, and herbology.  A note of caution...some forms of hibiscus are toxic to pets and animals.  

You may also enjoy the Fresh Margarita I created.


Ingredients

1 1/2 ounces apple brandy (Laird’s)
3/4 ounces Wild Hibiscus Rose Syrup
1/2 ounces wine blend of Sauvignon Blanc and Muscatel (Lillet Rosé)
Dash of orange bitters 
clear ice (ice cubes made from pure water or water that is boiled, cooled, boiled again, cooled, and then frozen in trays covered with plastic wrap)


Directions

Fill an old-fashioned glass with clear ice.
Carefully measure and pour the ingredients into the glass.
Gently and quickly stir.  
Optional:  garnish with an orange slice or twist 






Artisanal treats by Jesse Bluma at PointeViven
using organic ingredients and inspiration
from California, Central, and South America.

Order online or contact me for catering.

Join the Pointe Viven circle

sign-up for email updates.      


Slow Roasted Cherry Tomatoes and Triscuit with Dill-Cashew Cream by Jesse Bluma



Slow Roasted Cherry Tomatoes and Triscuit with Dill-Cashew Cream





Cherry Tomatoes and Triscuit Recipe

Triscuit topped with a dill-cashew cream adds a fresh, nutty and citrus flavor to the roasted cherry tomatoes. These snacks have layers of flavor to enjoy.


For the Dill-Cashew Cream (make a day ahead)

1 cup raw, unsalted cashews
1/4 cup organic olive oil
1/4 cup warm water
1/2 teaspoon sea salt
lemon
3 Tablespoons scissor snipped fresh dill
1 teaspoon organic yellow mustard
3 garlic cloves, peeled and minced
2 Tablespoons cold water

Place the cashews in a food processor and pulse, while streaming in the olive oil.
Pulse the cashew-olive oil mixture until smooth, approximately 1 minute.
Place the 1/2 teaspoon salt in 1/4 cup warm water, stir until the salt is dissolved.
Pour the salt-water into the food processor, then pulse to combine.
Pulse in the remaining ingredients:  zest of lemon, lemon juice, dill, mustard, garlic, and cold water.  Refrigerate for 24 hours to thicken.


For the Slow Roasted Cherry Tomatoes

1 pint organically grown heirloom medley cherry tomatoes
1/2 cup organic extra-virgin olive oil
3 cloves garlic, peeled and pressed
1 Tablespoon white vinegar
1 Tablespoon light brown sugar
1 teaspoon sea salt
Mix ingredients.
Then roast for 1 hour at 325 degrees Fahrenheit (or 163 degrees Celsius) on a non-reactive pan.


Additional Ingredients for Garnishing

- Grated panela, a soft and creamy Mexican cheese
- A snip of fresh basil.







Artisanal treats by Jesse Bluma at PointeViven
using organic ingredients and inspiration
from California, Central, and South America.

Order online or contact me for catering.

Join the Pointe Viven circle

sign-up for email updates.      


Thursday, August 14, 2014

Dill-Cashew Dip by Jesse Bluma









This creamy dip provides layers of flavor to vegetables, slow roasted tomatoes, crackers, chips, steak bites, sliced sausage, and more.  The dill has a bright, citrus flavor that enhances the nuttiness of the cashew purée.  An essential dip for your next party or event, that so happens to be vegan and vegetarian friendly.


Ingredients:  (make a day ahead)

1 cup raw, unsalted cashews
1/4 cup organic olive oil 
1/4 cup warm water
1/2 teaspoon sea salt
lemon
3 Tablespoons scissor snipped fresh dill
1 teaspoon organic yellow mustard
3 garlic cloves, peeled and minced
2 Tablespoons cold water


Directions

Place the cashews in a food processor and pulse, while streaming in the olive oil. 
Pulse the cashew-olive oil mixture until smooth, approximately 1 minute.
Place the 1/2 teaspoon salt in 1/4 cup warm water, stir until the salt is dissolved.  
Pour the salt-water into the food processor, then pulse to combine.  
Wash the lemon.  Then add the zest and juice of the lemon into the food processor.
Add in 3 Tablespoons snipped fresh dill.
Next, add in 1 teaspoon yellow mustard.
Then add in 3 minced garlic cloves.
Finally, add in the 2 Tablespoons cold water.
Pulse to combine ingredients.
Refrigerate the dill-cashew cream for 24 hours to thicken.
Makes approximately 10 ounces.






Artisanal treats by Jesse Bluma at PointeViven
using organic ingredients and inspiration
from California, Central, and South America.

Order online or contact me for catering.

Join the Pointe Viven circle

sign-up for email updates.      



Monday, August 11, 2014

The Spotlight Campaign: Good Stewards of Nature



The Spotlight Campaign:  Good Stewards of Nature






ABOUT THE CAMPAIGN

Our ideas, our creations, our spirit, and our great actions have always been key.  I know what it’s like to create something, the hard work it takes to accomplish goals, and to stand with others.  I know with my readers we share an elevated approach to food, information, and inspiration.  Liberating food and taste is the mission.  It is a holistic approach to living well and freeing our taste in food and much more.  Pointe Viven reflects my spirit and its clients.  It is a dynamic community of liberating food and taste.

 Over the years it has been terrific to meet, spotlight, and feature creators, doers, and inspirational figures.  I know no matter where I am, where I visit, and with whom I meet I will learn something and be re-energized by their endeavors.  Each month join me in spotlighting the famous, the not so famous, the local celebrities, and those you believe have earned a thank you, a congratulations, and the recognition.



Each month a new theme will be chosen, so be thinking of those people you know exhibit the traits.  Often the trait is something not so measurable, rather it is shown through the mundane, certain instances, and moments that surprise you.  This is your opportunity to join me and take part in the campaign.

In July we celebrated great leadership.   Those that exhibit a good sense of vision and inspire others.  Individuals making great strides in liberating their lives and the lives of others through a good sense of purpose.  

August:  This month we are spotlighting good stewards of nature.  We are looking for those that exhibit a sense of adventure, a spirit of respecting the world around them, and that value the land and resources they use for camping, fishing, hiking, recreation, hunting, ranching, and products created from natural resources.  

“In the wilderness, we can get our bearings. We can keep from getting blinded in our great human success to the fact that we are part of the life of this planet and we would do well to keep our perspectives and keep in touch with some of the basic facts of life.”--Congressman John P. Saylor

This month we are looking for individuals, enthusiasts, and environmental entrepreneurs that enjoy the great outdoors, are advocates of objective and reasoned solutions to challenges we face, and encourage and work with all stakeholders on these challenges.  Ultimately we are looking for those that enjoy being outside in forests, deserts, mountains, on lakes, or at sea.

“Generations hence, parents will take their children to these woods to show them how the land must have looked to the first Pilgrims and pioneers. And as Americans wander through these forests, climb these mountains, they will sense the love and majesty of the Creator of all of that.”--U.S. President Ronald Reagan







Artisanal treats by Jesse Bluma at PointeViven
using organic ingredients and inspiration
from California, Central, and South America.

Order online or contact me for catering.

Join the Pointe Viven circle

sign-up for email updates. 



Sources
FreeDigitalPhotos.net
http://conservamerica.org/


Wednesday, August 6, 2014

Swiss Chard and Triscuit with Andouille by Jesse Bluma




Swiss Chard and Triscuit with Andouille





Summer Greens and Triscuit Recipe

This recipe will satisfy your appetite for a salty, sweet, and savory snack.
 Ingredients include swiss chard, garlic, Mexican onion, lemon, mustard, and andouille sausage.


1 box Triscuits (whole wheat wafer crackers)

Dressing Ingredients

1 clove garlic
1/2 Tablespoon olive oil for sautéing garlic
zest of one organic lemon
juice of one lemon
1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
2 Tablespoons organic yellow mustard
pinch of salt
pinch of pepper


Directions for Dressing

Peel, cut off the stem, and mince the garlic clove (cutting lengthwise, then crosswise).
Place garlic in a pan with 1/2 Tablespoon olive oil on low heat.
Sauté for approximately 3 minutes.
Whisk olive oil into mustard, then combine with the garlic, zest of one lemon, lemon juice, salt, and pepper.


Ingredients for Topping

Mexican onion
Golden raisins (2 per Triscuit)
1 bunch Swiss chard
2 organic andouille sausages


Directions for Topping

Peel and wash the Mexican onion.
Thinly slice the green top of the onion.
Dice the white bulb.
Sauté Mexican onion for approximately 5 minutes, using same pan used for the garlic.

Wash and dry the Swiss chard.
Chop leaves and stems into small pieces.
Wilt the Swiss chard in the same pan used for the onion for approximately 2 minutes.

Mix the Mexican onion in with the Swiss chard.

Dice and prepare andouille sausages in a skillet on medium heat.


Assemble

Place a layer of the Swiss chard and onion mix on each Triscuit.
Top with a few pieces of the diced andouille.
Then add a couple golden raisins.
Finally, drizzle with the mustard dressing.







Artisanal treats by Jesse Bluma at PointeViven
using organic ingredients and inspiration
from California, Central, and South America.

Order online or contact me for catering.

Join the Pointe Viven circle

sign-up for email updates.      





Monday, August 4, 2014

Fresh Margarita by Jesse Bluma









Refreshing, smooth, and bright with flavor.  This recipe was something I created for my birthday.  I hired a mixologist to prepare the drinks, serve guests, and teach some mixology techniques.

You may also enjoy the Raspberry-Mint Martini I also created.  

Fresh lime juice is key to making an excellent margarita.  Equally important is a quality tequila.  Pair with a broiled vegetable mix:  peas, carrots, and corn (1 cup of each; 3 cups total),  1/2 teaspoon sea salt, 1/4 teaspoon fresh cracked black pepper, 1/8 teaspoon chili powder, 1 clove peeled and chopped garlic, 1/8 teaspoon smoked paprika (mix in after broiling), 1 Tablespoon olive oil.  Place under broiler for 8-10 minutes (use an oven safe, broil safe pan).  Sprinkle smoked paprika on broiled vegetables before serving.


Ingredients

24 organic limes to squeeze
3 organic limes for garnish (wedges or slices)
1 bottle tequila (El Tesoro Platinum)
lemon infused simple syrup; prepared ahead (oleo-saccharum)  (4 organic lemons, plus 1 cup or 8 ounces extra fine white sugar)
ice cubes


Directions for the simple syrup (oleo-saccharum).  Prepare ahead of time.

Wash and dry the lemons.
Use an apple or potato peeler to remove the peel of each lemon; not the white pith.
Place the lemon peels and extra fine white sugar in a bowl.
Muddle the lemon peel into the sugar for approximately three to five minutes, until the lemon oil is expressed.
Allow the muddled lemon peel and sugar mixture to rest for 1 hour.
Then remove the lemon peels from the sugar.
Place 1 cup or 8 ounces water in a saucepan.
Bring the water to a boil on medium heat.
Add in the lemon infused sugar.
Constantly stir the water and sugar until dissolved; no more than 5 minutes.  
Allow to completely cool before use.  (I store my simple syrup in a glass preserving jar.)


Directions for the Fresh Margarita

Carefully pierce each of the 24 limes (set the additional 3 limes aside for garnish) with a paring knife.  
Place the limes in batches of 6 on a microwaveable plate.
Microwave limes for 30 seconds.
Roll each lime, applying pressure on a counter.
Cut each lime lengthwise, then extract the juice from each with a reamer or juicer.
Pour the juice into a glass preserving jar.

Fill cocktail shaker half way with ice cubes, not crushed ice.
Add 1.5 ounces or 43 milliliters tequila in the shaker.
Pour in 1 ounce or 30 milliliters fresh squeezed lime juice in the shaker.
Then add in 1 ounce or 30 millimeters lemon infused simple syrup (oleo-saccharum).

Place the cap on the shaker.
Then vigorously and firmly shake the container for approximately 15 to 30 seconds.  If the shaker is frosty on the outside and cold, then the martini is mixed well inside.  
Remove the cap.

Fit a Hawthorne, julep, or spring strainer over the shaker.  (If you have a cobbler shaker, then a strainer is built-in to the top of the shaker.)
Hold the strainer firmly against the opening of the stainer with your fingers.

Serve in an old fashioned glass.
Garnish with lime.







Artisanal treats by Jesse Bluma at PointeViven
using organic ingredients and inspiration
from California, Central, and South America.

Order online or contact me for catering.

Join the Pointe Viven circle

sign-up for email updates.      

Sources:

FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Thursday, July 31, 2014

Raspberry-Mint Martini by Jesse Bluma








Enjoy this cocktail I created for my birthday celebration.  I wanted to enjoy the celebration, so rather than making cocktails myself I hired a mixologist.  He served guests my cocktails and demonstrated some mixology techniques.  It was a great experience.    

This elixir is best made with fresh raspberries and quality vodka.  Pair with a platter of blueberries, peeled and segmented grapefruit, slices of avocado rubbed with lemon juice, black cherries, and almonds.  Enjoy! 


Ingredients

ice cubes
lemon infused simple syrup; prepared ahead (oleo-saccharum) (4 organic lemons, plus 1 cup or 8 ounces extra fine white sugar)
organic mint (8 leaves per cocktail)
raspberry vodka (Absolut Raspberri)
raspberry liqueur (Mathilde Framboise)
organic raspberries


Directions for the simple syrup (oleo-saccharum).  Prepare ahead of time.

Wash and dry the lemons.
Use an apple or potato peeler to remove the peel of each lemon; not the white pith.
Place the lemon peels and extra fine white sugar in a bowl.
Muddle the lemon peel into the sugar for approximately three to five minutes, until the lemon oil is expressed.
Allow the muddled lemon peel and sugar mixture to rest for 1 hour.
Then remove the lemon peels from the sugar.
Place 1 cup or 8 ounces water in a saucepan.
Bring the water to a boil on medium heat.
Add in the lemon infused sugar.
Constantly stir the water and sugar until dissolved; no more than 5 minutes.  
Allow to completely cool before use.  (I store my simple syrup in a glass preserving jar.)


Directions for the Raspberry-Mint Martini

Muddle 8 leaves of mint in a cocktail shaker.
Fill cocktail shaker half way with ice cubes, not crushed ice.
Add 1.5 ounces or 43 milliliters raspberry vodka.
Then add 0.5 ounces or 15 milliliters raspberry liqueur.
Additionally, add in 0.5 ounces or 15 milliliters lemon infused simple syrup (oleo-saccharum).

Place the cap on the shaker.
Then vigorously and firmly shake the container for approximately 15 to 30 seconds.  If the shaker is frosty on the outside and cold, then the martini is mixed well inside.  
Remove the cap.

Fit a Hawthorne, julep, or spring stainer over the shaker.  (If you have a cobbler shaker, then a strainer is built-in to the top of the shaker.)
Hold the strainer firmly against the opening of the stainer with your fingers.

Pour into an empty glass.  
Garnish with raspberries.






Artisanal treats by Jesse Bluma at PointeViven
using organic ingredients and inspiration
from California, Central, and South America.

Order online or contact me for catering.

Join the Pointe Viven circle

sign-up for email updates.      
  



Sources:

FreeDigitalPhotos.net

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